amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Louise Glück, born 22 April 1943
Seven Quotes
It seems to me that the desire to make art produces an ongoing experience of longing… Always there seems something ahead, the next poem or story, visible, at least, apprehensible, but unreachable… It’s like a lighthouse, except that, as one swims towards it, it backs away.
Usually the person who is going to develop into a writer is a sensitive reader and a good critic. When people are good critics, anything can happen. That means there is a deep alertness to syntax, to language.
I think the question of who’s going to be a writer has more to do with intelligence and hunger than anything you would say was talent. There’s a ton of talent, first of all, and it takes you only so far. People with toughness and willingness to start over, combined with really remarkable minds and intense need, those are the people who can become anything.
I feel quite passionately that the degree to which I have, if I have, stayed alive as a writer and changed as a writer, owes much to the intensity with which I’ve immersed myself in the work, sometimes very alien work, of people younger than I, people making sounds I haven’t heard. 
I took my first teaching job, and the minute I started to teach I started to write. I’ve always connected teaching and writing.
Of two sisters one is always the watcher, one the dancer.
We look at the world once, in childhood. The rest is memory.
Glück is an American poet. She was appointed Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress in 2003.
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Louise Glück, born 22 April 1943

Seven Quotes

  1. It seems to me that the desire to make art produces an ongoing experience of longing… Always there seems something ahead, the next poem or story, visible, at least, apprehensible, but unreachable… It’s like a lighthouse, except that, as one swims towards it, it backs away.
  2. Usually the person who is going to develop into a writer is a sensitive reader and a good critic. When people are good critics, anything can happen. That means there is a deep alertness to syntax, to language.
  3. I think the question of who’s going to be a writer has more to do with intelligence and hunger than anything you would say was talent. There’s a ton of talent, first of all, and it takes you only so far. People with toughness and willingness to start over, combined with really remarkable minds and intense need, those are the people who can become anything.
  4. I feel quite passionately that the degree to which I have, if I have, stayed alive as a writer and changed as a writer, owes much to the intensity with which I’ve immersed myself in the work, sometimes very alien work, of people younger than I, people making sounds I haven’t heard. 
  5. I took my first teaching job, and the minute I started to teach I started to write. I’ve always connected teaching and writing.
  6. Of two sisters one is always the watcher, one the dancer.
  7. We look at the world once, in childhood. The rest is memory.

Glück is an American poet. She was appointed Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress in 2003.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

(via matchinacrocus)

56 notes

"You either like me or you don’t. It took me twenty-something years to learn how to love myself, I don’t have that kinda time to convince somebody else."

Daniel Franzese   (via housewifeswag)

(Source: durianquotes, via conspicuous-ac)

113,891 notes

kimiooon:

ok, so I was drawing centaurs, yeah, and then WHAT IF WE REVERSE THE CENTAUR ??

kimiooon:

ok, so I was drawing centaurs, yeah, and then WHAT IF WE REVERSE THE CENTAUR ??

(via yoccu)

5,023 notes

You never had to prove them wrong

realsocialskills:

When you grow up with stigma, people tell you a lot of well-meaning things that actually cause problems. When you face people treating you like you’re less of a person, someone will often say something like:

  • "You’ll prove them all wrong some day".
  • "It’s ok. You’ll show them. You’ll prove that you’re better than they ever could have imagined."

And then, when you accomplish things, it often becomes, “Well, you proved them wrong, didn’t you?”

People who say this often mean well, but this is a form of victim-blaming, and it can hurt people who believe it really badly. The truth is:
You didn’t prove them wrong. You never had to prove them wrong. They were already wrong.
Prejudice is not something you have to earn your way out of. Dehumanization isn’t your fault. You don’t have to prove that you are human in order to be human. You don’t have to have amazing accomplishments in order to prove that you have worth. Everyone has worth. People who don’t recognize yours have always been wrong.
You didn’t prove them wrong. They were already wrong. About you, and about everyone else too.
You might have to fight to be seen as a person. You might have to fight for your life and your safety and for basic respect. That’s a fight you may or may not win. It’s a fight that, no matter how hard you try or how good you are, you will never win all the way. There will still be those who hate you and see you as subhuman.
But you can be ok, anyway. You’re ok. You’re whole. You deserve better. It’s not your fault they don’t see it. It’s theirs.
You have always been a full person, fully deserving of respect and equal treatment. People who treat you as a lesser being have always been wrong.
Knowing that helps.

Someday I’ll know this.

(via lovethyfatness)

1,749 notes

12.09.14

(via markargent)

28,506 notes

misswallflower:

Strange little creatures by oso polar

Oh my goooood these are presh

Kinda makes me want to make art dolls :o

(via markargent)

22,097 notes

"I dunno, just laying face down on the couch and waiting for some baby boomers to die, I guess"

Millennials, when asked about plans for the future (via alwaysfaithfulterriblelizard)

(Source: hermione-ganja, via isthatwhatyoucalllearning)

19,613 notes

textsfromtng:

Submitted by tropelocker.

textsfromtng:

Submitted by tropelocker.

(via cabell)

1,737 notes

boywitch:

an end to patriarchal masculinity would help EVERYONE it would make EVERYONE happier and safer 

(Source: gothichunny, via markargent)

413 notes

catsncats:

**boop**

(Source: tastefullyoffensive, via markargent)

17,348 notes